Including More Than 450 Adoptee-Recommended Titles!

Category: Journalism/Research

  • Out of Place: The Lives of Korean Adoptee Immigrants

    Out of Place: The Lives of Korean Adoptee Immigrants

    by SunAh M. Laybourn

    Since the early 1950s, over 125,000 Korean children have been adopted in the United States, primarily by white families. Korean adoptees figure in twenty-five percent of US transnational adoptions and are the largest group of transracial adoptees currently in adulthood. Despite being legally adopted, Korean…

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  • Who Is a Worthy Mother?: An Intimate History of Adoption

    Who Is a Worthy Mother?: An Intimate History of Adoption

    by Rebecca Wellington

    Nearly every person in the United States is affected by adoption. Adoption practices are woven into the fabric of American society and reflect how our nation values human beings, particularly mothers. In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade, the renewed…

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  • Relinquished: The Politics of Adoption and the Privilege of American Motherhood

    Relinquished: The Politics of Adoption and the Privilege of American Motherhood

    by Gretchen Sisson

    Adoption has always been viewed as a beloved institution for building families, as well as a mutually agreeable common ground in the abortion debate, but little attention has been paid to the lives of mothers who relinquish infants for private adoption. Relinquished reveals adoption to be a…

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  • In Reunion: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Communication of Family

    In Reunion: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Communication of Family

    by Sara Docan-Morgan

    “Do you know your real parents?” is a question many adoptees are asked. In In Reunion, Sara Docan-Morgan probes the basic notions of family, adoption, and parenthood by exploring initial meetings and ongoing relationships that transnational Korean adoptees have had with their birth parents and other…

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  • Adoption Unfiltered: Revelations from Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Parents, and Allies

    Adoption Unfiltered: Revelations from Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Parents, and Allies

    by Sara Easterly, Kelsey Vander Vliet Ranyard, and Lori Holden

    Adoption Unfiltered authors Sara Easterly (adoptee), Kelsey Vander Vliet Ranyard (birth parent), and Lori Holden (adoptive parent) interview dozens of adoptees, birth parents, adoptive parents, social workers, therapists, and other allies–all sharing candidly about the challenges in adoption. While finding common ground in the sometimes-contentious…

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  • Adoption Fantasies: The Fetishization of Asian Adoptees from Girlhood to Womanhood

    Adoption Fantasies: The Fetishization of Asian Adoptees from Girlhood to Womanhood

    by Kimberly D. McKee

    In Adoption Fantasies, Kimberly D. McKee explores the ways adopted Asian women and girls are situated at a nexus of objectifications—as adoptees and as Asian American women—and how they negotiate competing expectations based on sensationalist and fictional portrayals of adoption found in US popular culture. McKee…

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  • Adult Adoptees and Writing to Heal: Migrating Toward Wholeness

    Adult Adoptees and Writing to Heal: Migrating Toward Wholeness

    by Liz DeBetta

    We live in a world where conversations about trauma are becoming commonplace and adopted people are using their voices to educate the general public about the effects of maternal separation and genealogical bewilderment. But for many adult adoptees the act of speaking truth to power…

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  • We Were Once a Family: A Story of Love, Death, and Child Removal in America

    We Were Once a Family: A Story of Love, Death, and Child Removal in America

    by Roxanna Asgarian

    The shocking, deeply reported story of a murder-suicide that claimed the lives of six children–and a searing indictment of the American foster care system. On March 26, 2018, rescue workers discovered a crumpled SUV and the bodies of two women and multiple children at the…

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  • Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family

    Somewhere Sisters: A Story of Adoption, Identity, and the Meaning of Family

    by Erika Hayasaki

    An incredible, deeply reported story of identical twins Isabella and Hà, born in Viêt Nam and raised on opposite sides of the world, each knowing little about the other’s existence until they were reunited as teenagers, against all odds. It was 1998 in Nha Trang,…

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  • Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences

    Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences

    by Janine M. Baer

    Generations of adults who were adopted as children have been kept in the dark about their original identities. The law sealing birth records forever, even to the adopted person, passed in 1935 in California, sweeping adoption´s emotional complexities under the rug and making it possible to…

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  • Ripped at the Root: An Adoption Story

    Ripped at the Root: An Adoption Story

    by Mary Cardaras

    “With searing detail and lean, crisp prose, in Ripped at the Root Mary Cardaras tells the story of Dena Polites, a woman born to a young unwed Greek couple who was adopted by married Greek Americans in Ohio. Polites’s tale serves as a focal point…

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  • A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law

    A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law

    by Darryl Nelson

    A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law traces Australian laws affecting thousands, back to the US theories of eugenics, then back to Britain. It highlights the various notions of ‘the best interests of the child’ in law, over time, and shows how the poor…

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  • Ireland and the Magdalene Laundries: A Campaign for Justice

    Ireland and the Magdalene Laundries: A Campaign for Justice

    by Claire McGettrick, Katherine O’Donnell, Maeve O’Rourke, James M. Smith, and Mari Steed

    Between 1922 and 1996, over 10,000 girls and women were imprisoned in Magdalene Laundries, including those considered ‘promiscuous’, a burden to their families or the state, those who had been sexually abused or raised in the care of the Church and State, and unmarried mothers.…

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  • What White Parents Should Know about Transracial Adoption: An Adoptee’s Perspective on Its History, Nuances, and Practices

    What White Parents Should Know about Transracial Adoption: An Adoptee’s Perspective on Its History, Nuances, and Practices

    by Melissa Guida-Richards

    If you’re the white parent of a transracially or internationally adopted child, you may have been told that if you try your best and work your hardest, good intentions and a whole lot of love will be enough to give your child the security, attachment,…

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  • American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption

    American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption

    by Gabrielle Glaser

    During the Baby Boom in 1960s America, women were encouraged to stay home and raise large families, but sex and childbirth were taboo subjects. Premarital sex was common, but birth control was hard to get and abortion was illegal. In 1961, sixteen-year-old Margaret Erle fell…

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  • Adoption’s Hidden History: Steps to Sealing the Records (Vol. 2)

    Adoption’s Hidden History: Steps to Sealing the Records (Vol. 2)

    by Mary S. Payne

    An estimated six million Americans are adopted. The development of laws and regulations facilitating this process has been shrouded in mystery. “Adoption’s Hidden History” is for anyone who has ever been touched by adoption. From Myra Clark Gaines’ nineteenth century court fight for recognition as…

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  • Adoption’s Hidden History: From Native American Tribes to Locked Lives (Vol. 1)

    Adoption’s Hidden History: From Native American Tribes to Locked Lives (Vol. 1)

    by Mary S. Payne

    Adoptions are finalized daily across America. Like the root system of a giant oak, tentacles of its history are submerged in years of human experience. Native Americans adopted children and adults into their tribes before pilgrims settled in the New World. Early-day adoption advocates took…

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  • Adoption, Memory, and Cold War Greece: Kid pro quo?

    Adoption, Memory, and Cold War Greece: Kid pro quo?

    by Gonda Van Steen

    This book presents a committed quest to unravel and document the postwar adoption networks that placed more than 3,000 Greek children in the United States, in a movement accelerated by the aftermath of the Greek Civil War and by the new conditions of the global…

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  • Finding Fernanda: Two Mothers, One Child, and a Cross-Border Search for Truth

    Finding Fernanda: Two Mothers, One Child, and a Cross-Border Search for Truth

    by Erin Siegal

    The dramatic story of how an American housewife discovered that the Guatemalan child she was about to adopt had been stolen from her birth mother. Over the last decade, nearly 200,000 children have been adopted into the United States, 25,000 of whom came from Guatemala. Finding…

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  • The Politics of Reproduction: Adoption, Abortion, and Surrogacy in the Age of Neoliberalism

    The Politics of Reproduction: Adoption, Abortion, and Surrogacy in the Age of Neoliberalism

    Edited by Modhumita Roy and Mary Thompson

    The Politics of Reproduction: Adoption, Abortion and Surrogacy in the Age of Neoliberalism uniquely brings together three sites of reproduction and reproductive politics to demonstrate their entanglement in creating or restricting options for family-making. The original essays in this collection—which draw from a wide range of disciplinary and…

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  • Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption: Embodiment and Emotion

    Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption: Embodiment and Emotion

    by Jessica Walton

    This book investigates the experiences of South Koreans adopted into Western families and the complexity of what it means to ‘feel identity’ beyond what is written in official adoption files. Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption is based on ethnographic fieldwork in South Korea and interviews…

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  • Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States

    Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States

    by Kimberly D. McKee

    Since the Korean War began, Western families have adopted more than 200,000 Korean children. Two thirds of these adoptees found homes in the United States. The majority joined white families and in the process forged a new kind of transnational and transracial kinship. Kimberly D.…

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  • Origin Narratives: The Stories We Tell Children About Immigration and International Adoption

    Origin Narratives: The Stories We Tell Children About Immigration and International Adoption

    by Macarena García-González

    The first of its kind, this volume unpacks the cultural construction of transnational adoption and migration by examining a sample of recent children’s books that address the subject. Of all European countries, Spain is the nation where immigration and transnational adoption have increased most steeply…

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  • Adoption, Identity, and Kinship: The Debate over Sealed Birth Records

    Adoption, Identity, and Kinship: The Debate over Sealed Birth Records

    by Katarina Wegar

    In this thoughtful book, sociologist Katarina Wegar offers a new perspective on adoption and the search debate, placing them within a social context. She argues that Americans who are embroiled in adoption controversies have failed to understand how much the debate, adoption research, and the…

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  • The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the American Family

    The Best Possible Immigrants: International Adoption and the American Family

    by Rachel Rains Winslow

    Prior to World War II, international adoption was virtually unknown, but in the twenty-first century, it has become a common practice, touching almost every American. How did the adoption of foreign children by U.S. families become an essential part of American culture in such a…

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  • The Colour of Time: A Longitudinal Exploration of the Impact of Intercountry Adoption in Australia

    The Colour of Time: A Longitudinal Exploration of the Impact of Intercountry Adoption in Australia

    Compiled by Lynelle Long for International Social Service (ISS) Australia

    This sequel to The Colour of Difference examines the path of identity formation, openness within the adoptive family, and the long-term impact on intercountry adoptees. It highlights how open discussion and dialogue within an adoptive family — along with strong encouragement and facilitation to connect with culture…

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  • Life Lines: Writing Transcultural Adoption

    Life Lines: Writing Transcultural Adoption

    by John McLeod

    Adoptions that cross the lines of culture, race, and nation are a major consequence of conflicts around the globe, yet their histories and representations have rarely been considered. Life Lines: Writing Transcultural Adoption is the first critical study to explore narratives of transcultural adoption from contemporary Britain,…

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  • The Adoption Machine: The Dark History of Ireland’s Mother & Baby Homes and the Inside Story of How “Tuam 800” Became a Global Scandal

    The Adoption Machine: The Dark History of Ireland’s Mother & Baby Homes and the Inside Story of How “Tuam 800” Became a Global Scandal

    by Paul Jude Redmond

    MAY 2014. The Irish public woke to the horrific discovery of a mass grave containing the remains of almost 800 babies in the “Angels’ Plot’ of Tuam’s Mother and Baby Home. What followed would rock the last vestiges of Catholic Ireland, enrage an increasingly secularised…

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  • Spare the Kids: Why Whupping Children Won’t Save Black America

    Spare the Kids: Why Whupping Children Won’t Save Black America

    by Stacey Patton

    Why do so many African Americans have such a special attachment to whupping children? Studies show that nearly 80 percent of black parents see spanking, popping, pinching, and beating as reasonable, effective ways to teach respect and to protect black children from the streets, incarceration,…

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  • The Baby Scoop Era: Unwed Mothers, Infant Adoption and Forced Surrender

    The Baby Scoop Era: Unwed Mothers, Infant Adoption and Forced Surrender

    by Karen Wilson-Buterbaugh

    An expose of unethical and coercive adoption industry practices during a short period in American history known as the Baby Scoop Era (Post WWII – 1972). By sharing the actual printed words of social caseworkers, maternity home personnel, lawyers, judges, medical and mental health practitioners,…

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