Including More Than 450 Adoptee-Recommended Titles!

Journalism/Research

  • A Law of Blood-ties: The “Right” to Access Genetic Ancestry

    A Law of Blood-ties: The “Right” to Access Genetic Ancestry

    by Alice Diver

    This text collates and examines the jurisprudence that currently exists in respect of blood-tied genetic connection, arguing that the right to identity often rests upon the ability to identify biological ancestors, which in turn requires an absence of adult-centric veto norms. It looks firstly to…

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  • A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law

    A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law

    by Darryl Nelson

    A Timeline of the Injustice of Adoption Law traces Australian laws affecting thousands, back to the US theories of eugenics, then back to Britain. It highlights the various notions of ‘the best interests of the child’ in law, over time, and shows how the poor…

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  • Adoption Deception: A Personal and Professional Journey

    Adoption Deception: A Personal and Professional Journey

    by Penny Mackieson

    Have you ever wondered how it might feel to have been adopted in Australia during the pre-1980s era in which vulnerable young mothers were coerced into relinquishing their babies? How it might feel to have grown up, become a social worker and worked with vulnerable…

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  • Adoption Fantasies: The Fetishization of Asian Adoptees from Girlhood to Womanhood

    Adoption Fantasies: The Fetishization of Asian Adoptees from Girlhood to Womanhood

    by Kimberly D. McKee

    In Adoption Fantasies, Kimberly D. McKee explores the ways adopted Asian women and girls are situated at a nexus of objectifications—as adoptees and as Asian American women—and how they negotiate competing expectations based on sensationalist and fictional portrayals of adoption found in US popular culture. McKee…

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  • Adoption Unfiltered: Revelations from Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Parents, and Allies

    Adoption Unfiltered: Revelations from Adoptees, Birth Parents, Adoptive Parents, and Allies

    by Sara Easterly, Kelsey Vander Vliet Ranyard, and Lori Holden

    Adoption Unfiltered authors Sara Easterly (adoptee), Kelsey Vander Vliet Ranyard (birth parent), and Lori Holden (adoptive parent) interview dozens of adoptees, birth parents, adoptive parents, social workers, therapists, and other allies–all sharing candidly about the challenges in adoption. While finding common ground in the sometimes-contentious…

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  • Adoption’s Hidden History: From Native American Tribes to Locked Lives (Vol. 1)

    Adoption’s Hidden History: From Native American Tribes to Locked Lives (Vol. 1)

    by Mary S. Payne

    Adoptions are finalized daily across America. Like the root system of a giant oak, tentacles of its history are submerged in years of human experience. Native Americans adopted children and adults into their tribes before pilgrims settled in the New World. Early-day adoption advocates took…

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  • Adoption’s Hidden History: Steps to Sealing the Records (Vol. 2)

    Adoption’s Hidden History: Steps to Sealing the Records (Vol. 2)

    by Mary S. Payne

    An estimated six million Americans are adopted. The development of laws and regulations facilitating this process has been shrouded in mystery. “Adoption’s Hidden History” is for anyone who has ever been touched by adoption. From Myra Clark Gaines’ nineteenth century court fight for recognition as…

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  • Adoption, Identity, and Kinship: The Debate over Sealed Birth Records

    Adoption, Identity, and Kinship: The Debate over Sealed Birth Records

    by Katarina Wegar

    In this thoughtful book, sociologist Katarina Wegar offers a new perspective on adoption and the search debate, placing them within a social context. She argues that Americans who are embroiled in adoption controversies have failed to understand how much the debate, adoption research, and the…

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  • Adoption, Memory, and Cold War Greece: Kid pro quo?

    Adoption, Memory, and Cold War Greece: Kid pro quo?

    by Gonda Van Steen

    This book presents a committed quest to unravel and document the postwar adoption networks that placed more than 3,000 Greek children in the United States, in a movement accelerated by the aftermath of the Greek Civil War and by the new conditions of the global…

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  • Adult Adoptees and Writing to Heal: Migrating Toward Wholeness

    Adult Adoptees and Writing to Heal: Migrating Toward Wholeness

    by Liz DeBetta

    We live in a world where conversations about trauma are becoming commonplace and adopted people are using their voices to educate the general public about the effects of maternal separation and genealogical bewilderment. But for many adult adoptees the act of speaking truth to power…

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  • American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption

    American Baby: A Mother, a Child, and the Shadow History of Adoption

    by Gabrielle Glaser

    During the Baby Boom in 1960s America, women were encouraged to stay home and raise large families, but sex and childbirth were taboo subjects. Premarital sex was common, but birth control was hard to get and abortion was illegal. In 1961, sixteen-year-old Margaret Erle fell…

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  • Called Home, Book 2: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects

    Called Home, Book 2: Lost Children of the Indian Adoption Projects

    Edited by Patricia Busbee and Trace A. DeMeyer

    From recent news about Baby Veronica to history like Operation Papoose, this book examines how Native American adoptees and their families experienced adoption and were exposed to the genocidal policies of governments who created Indian adoption projects. The editors Trace A. DeMeyer and Patricia Busbee, both…

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  • Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States

    Disrupting Kinship: Transnational Politics of Korean Adoption in the United States

    by Kimberly D. McKee

    Since the Korean War began, Western families have adopted more than 200,000 Korean children. Two thirds of these adoptees found homes in the United States. The majority joined white families and in the process forged a new kind of transnational and transracial kinship. Kimberly D.…

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  • Family Matters: Secrecy and Disclosure in the History of Adoption

    Family Matters: Secrecy and Disclosure in the History of Adoption

    by E. Wayne Carp

    Adoption is a hot topic–played out in the news and on TV talk shows, in advice columns and tell-all tales–but for the 25 million Americans who are members of the adoption triad of adoptees, adoptive parents, and birth parents, the true story of adoption has…

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  • Finding Fernanda: Two Mothers, One Child, and a Cross-Border Search for Truth

    Finding Fernanda: Two Mothers, One Child, and a Cross-Border Search for Truth

    by Erin Siegal

    The dramatic story of how an American housewife discovered that the Guatemalan child she was about to adopt had been stolen from her birth mother. Over the last decade, nearly 200,000 children have been adopted into the United States, 25,000 of whom came from Guatemala. Finding…

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  • Finding Our Place: 100 Memorable Adoptees, Fostered Persons, and Orphanage Alumni

    Finding Our Place: 100 Memorable Adoptees, Fostered Persons, and Orphanage Alumni

    by Nikki McCaslin with Richard Uhrlaub and Marilyn Grotsky

    This unique one-volume reference guide provides positive and empowering biographical sketches of 100 famous and well-known adoptees throughout time, serving to counter the many negative stereotypes that exist that exist about people who were adopted, fostered, or lived in orphanages. This work looks at the…

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  • From Home to Homeland: What Adoptive Families Need to Know before Making a Return Trip to China

    From Home to Homeland: What Adoptive Families Need to Know before Making a Return Trip to China

    Edited by Debra Jacobs, Iris Chin Ponte, and Leslie Kim Wang

    Every year, hundreds of adoptive families embark on homeland trips to China and other countries. Homeland trips offer great opportunities for helping adopted children develop a coherent narrative that makes sense of their complicated beginnings. Although the trip can be a joyful experience, it can…

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  • Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America

    Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America

    by Catherine Ceniza Choy

    In the last fifty years, transnational adoption—specifically, the adoption of Asian children—has exploded in popularity as an alternative path to family making. Despite the cultural acceptance of this practice, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the factors that allowed Asian international adoption to flourish.…

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  • Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences

    Growing in the Dark: Adoption Secrecy and Its Consequences

    by Janine M. Baer

    Generations of adults who were adopted as children have been kept in the dark about their original identities. The law sealing birth records forever, even to the adopted person, passed in 1935 in California, sweeping adoption´s emotional complexities under the rug and making it possible to…

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  • How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm: And Other Adventures in Parenting (from Argentina to Tanzania and everywhere in between)

    How Eskimos Keep Their Babies Warm: And Other Adventures in Parenting (from Argentina to Tanzania and everywhere in between)

    by Mei-Ling Hopgood

    Mei-Ling Hopgood, a first-time mom from suburban Michigan―now living in Buenos Aires―was shocked that Argentine parents allow their children to stay up until all hours of the night. Could there really be social and developmental advantages to this custom? Driven by a journalist’s curiosity and…

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  • In Reunion: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Communication of Family

    In Reunion: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Communication of Family

    by Sara Docan-Morgan

    “Do you know your real parents?” is a question many adoptees are asked. In In Reunion, Sara Docan-Morgan probes the basic notions of family, adoption, and parenthood by exploring initial meetings and ongoing relationships that transnational Korean adoptees have had with their birth parents and other…

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  • In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

    In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

    by Rita J. Simon and Rhonda M. Roorda

    Nearly forty years after researchers first sought to determine the effects, if any, on children adopted by families whose racial or ethnic background differed from their own, the debate over transracial adoption continues. In this collection of interviews conducted with black and biracial young adults…

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  • In Their Parents’ Voices: Reflections on Raising Transracial Adoptees

    In Their Parents’ Voices: Reflections on Raising Transracial Adoptees

    by Rita J. Simon and Rhonda M. Roorda

    Rita J. Simon and Rhonda M. Roorda’s In Their Own Voices: Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories shared the experiences of twenty-four black and biracial children who had been adopted into white families in the late 1960s and ’70s. The book has since become a standard resource…

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  • In Their Siblings’ Voices: White Non-Adopted Siblings Talk About Their Experiences Being Raised with Black and Biracial Brothers and Sisters

    In Their Siblings’ Voices: White Non-Adopted Siblings Talk About Their Experiences Being Raised with Black and Biracial Brothers and Sisters

    by Rita J. Simon and Rhonda M. Roorda

    In Their Siblings’ Voices shares the stories of twenty white non-adopted siblings who grew up with black or biracial brothers and sisters in the late 1960s and 1970s. Belonging to the same families profiled in Rita J. Simon and Rhonda M. Roorda’s In Their Own…

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  • In Their Voices: Black Americans on Transracial Adoption

    In Their Voices: Black Americans on Transracial Adoption

    by Rhonda M. Roorda

    While many proponents of transracial adoption claim that American society is increasingly becoming “color-blind,” a growing body of research reveals that for transracial adoptees of all backgrounds, racial identity does matter. Rhonda M. Roorda elaborates significantly on that finding, specifically studying the effects of the…

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  • Invisible Asians: Korean American Adoptees, Asian American Experiences, and Racial Exceptionalism

    Invisible Asians: Korean American Adoptees, Asian American Experiences, and Racial Exceptionalism

    by Kim Park Nelson

    The first Korean adoptees were powerful symbols of American superiority in the Cold War; as Korean adoption continued, adoptees’ visibility as Asians faded as they became a geopolitical success story—all-American children in loving white families. In Invisible Asians, Kim Park Nelson analyzes the processes by…

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  • Ireland and the Magdalene Laundries: A Campaign for Justice

    Ireland and the Magdalene Laundries: A Campaign for Justice

    by Claire McGettrick, Katherine O’Donnell, Maeve O’Rourke, James M. Smith, and Mari Steed

    Between 1922 and 1996, over 10,000 girls and women were imprisoned in Magdalene Laundries, including those considered ‘promiscuous’, a burden to their families or the state, those who had been sexually abused or raised in the care of the Church and State, and unmarried mothers.…

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  • Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption: Embodiment and Emotion

    Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption: Embodiment and Emotion

    by Jessica Walton

    This book investigates the experiences of South Koreans adopted into Western families and the complexity of what it means to ‘feel identity’ beyond what is written in official adoption files. Korean Adoptees and Transnational Adoption is based on ethnographic fieldwork in South Korea and interviews…

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